(Originally aired: 02-01-99)

 

  

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(Originally aired: 02-01-99)

 

  

-------------------------

HOME

ABOUT

CONTEXT

TV Schedule
Current

Science Design Decade - 1965-1975 Buckminster Fuller

MonPast Programs (To Some  Programs l    - Link to all in Creation)

INDEX GUEST LISTING BY NAME 01-01-73 TO 06-30-11 (Complete List in Creation)

Public AccessTV,
A Systems Consideration Graphics

Current Financial Crisis
Oct., 2008

Autodidact Tutorials

Keynes Letter to
Grandchildren 1930

Panel: Louis Kelso, Hon. William Simon, Hon. Russell Long / Jan. 1974.

Synergetic Educational Manifesto 1970

Carbon 60 # 1

ACAP - The Association of
Cable Access Producers

ACAP Site Link
www.acaptv.net

The Works of Civilazation

Aymara Cultural Hearth

FEEDBACK

LINKS

CONTACT

       

 

       Cablecast and web streaming of program

                              in series

"Conversations with Harold Hudson Channer"

                Upcoming Cable Television/Web Show: 

          For details of airing see bottom of page

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FRIDAY JULY 22, 2016

 

(Originally aired: 07-31-08)                       

              GEORGE C. STONEY

                     

                         

              

 Photos by geo geller

    

                   Professor: Film/TV - N.Y. University  

                          Tisch School of the Arts

                         Award Winning Director:

                     

                                 All My Babies

          

    Pioneer Public Access Cable Television Activist

 

                 Stalwart Board Member:

               Manhattan Neighborhood Network                     

                                                    www.mnn.org

                                                    gcs1@nyu.edu

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The program can be viewed in its entirety by clicking the you tube link below:

http://youtube.com/watch?v=KY0IKqf3Jgg - GEORGE STONEY

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More about: GEORGE C. STONEY

 

 

George Stoney


George Stoney is the writer, director, and
 
 producer of over fifty documentaries and
 
 television series, including All My Babies
 
 (1953), How the Myth Was Made (1978),
 
 Southern Voices (1985), Images of the Great
 
 Depression (1990), and The Uprising of ’34
 
 (1995). He has taught film at the University
 
 of Southern California, City College of New
 
 York,
 

Columbia University, Stanford University, and
 
 New York University, where he received the
 
 NYU Great Teacher Award (1988). He has
 
 been a mentor and inspiration for
 
 generations of aspiring filmmakers, with his
 
 commitment to illuminating social issues
 
 and humanitarian concerns.
 


Taught film at University of Southern
 
 California, City College (CUNY), Columbia
 
 University, and Stanford University. Lectures
 
 and short courses at the British National
 
 Film School; Portland State University;
 
 University of Ibadan in Nigeria; Antioch
 
 College; UCLA; and others. Writer, director,
 
 and producer of over 50 documentaries and
 
 television series, including the award-
 
 winning All My Babies (1953); How the Myth
 
 Was Made (1978); Southern Voices (1985);
 
 How One Painter Sees (1988); and Images
 
 of the Great Depression (1990). Executive
 
 producer, Challenge for Change program at
 
 the National Film Board of Canada (1968-
 
 1970). Founding board member, National
 
 Federation of Local Cable Programmers
 
 (1976-1986). Recipient, NYU Great Teacher
 
 Award  (1988) and Manhattan Borough
 
 President's Award  (1989). Named to the
 
 Manhattan Community Cable Access Board
 
 (1991).  Recipient of Leo Dratfield Award.
 

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George C. Stoney

 
 
George C. Stoney
Born George Cashel Stoney
July 1, 1916
Winston-Salem, North Carolina, U.S.
Died July 12, 2012 (aged 96)
New York, New York, U.S.
Nationality American
Occupation filmmaker, educator
Known for documentary film, public-access television

George Cashel Stoney (July 1, 1916 – July 12, 2012) was an American documentary filmmaker, an educator, and the "father of public-access television". Among his films were All My Babies (1953), How the Myth Was Made (1979) and The Uprising of '34 (1995). All My Babies was entered into the National Film Registry in 2002. [1][2] Stoney's life and work were the subject of a Festschrift volume of the journal Wide Angle in 1999.[3]

George Cashel Stoney was born in 1916.[4] He studied English and History at the University of North Carolina and Balliol College in Oxford, and received a Film in Education Certificate from the University of London. He worked at the Henry Street Settlement House on the Lower East Side of NYC in 1938, as a field research assistant for Gunnar Myrdal and Ralph Bunche's project on Suffrage in the South in 1940, and as an information officer for the Farm Security Administration until he was drafted in 1942. Throughout this time he also wrote free-lance articles for many newspapers and magazines, including the Raleigh News and Observer and the Survey Graphic. He served as a photo intelligence officer in World War II. In 1946, he joined the Southern Educational Film Service as writer and director. He started his own production company in 1950, taught at Stanford University from 1965–67 and directed the Challenge for Change project, a socially active documentary production wing of the National Film Board of Canada from 1968-70.[5] With Red Burns, Stoney co-founded the Alternate Media Center in 1972, which trained citizens in the tools of video production for a brand new medium, Public-access television.[6] An early advocate of democratic media, Stoney is often cited as being the "father of public-access television".

Stoney made over 50 documentary films on wide ranging subjects. All My Babies, one of his first films, received numerous awards and was inducted into the National Film Registry in 2002.

Stoney was an active member of the Board of Directors for the Manhattan Neighborhood Network (MNN) and the Alliance for Community Media (ACM). Each year, the ACM presents "The George Stoney Award" to an organization or individual who has made an outstanding contribution to championing the growth and experience of humanistic community communications.

In 1971, Stoney became a professor at New York University's Tisch School of the Arts. He was an emeritus professor there at this death. Stoney had been team-teaching a course with David Bagnall, his long-time film collaborator and former student.

He died peacefully at the age of 96 at his home in New York City.[1][7][8]

References

  • Vitello, Paul (July 14, 2012). "George C. Stoney, Documentary Filmmaker, Dies at 96". The
  • New York Times.
  • "Local Public Access TV Under Attack From Trio of Congressional Bills". Democracy Now!. September 30, 2005.
  • Abrash, Barbara; Jackson, Lynne; Mertes, Cara, eds. (March 1999). "George Stoney Festschrift". Wide Angle 21 (2).
  • Alexander, Geoff (2012). "George C. Stoney". Academic Film Archive of North America.
  • Weldon, Carolyne (16 July 2012). "Tribute to Challenge for Change Director George C. Stoney". NFB.ca. National Film Board of Canada. Retrieved 19 July 2012.
  • "History of ITP". New York University.
  • Announcement on the ACM Facebook page by board chair Deb Rogers
    1. Posting to the ACM (non-public) listserv by Sue Buske, long time friend of George.

    Further reading

    External links

  • -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    George C. Stoney (1916-) is a professor of film and cinema studies at New York University,

     and a pioneer in the field of documentary film. Stoney directed several influential films

     including All My Babies and How the Myth Was Made. He is considered as the father of

     public access television[1].

     

    George Stoney studied journalism at NYU and the University of North Carolina. He has

     worked as a photo intelligence officer in World War II, for the Farm Security Administration an

     information officer, and as a freelance journalist. In 1946, he joined the Southern Educational

     Film Service as writer and director. He started his own production company in 1950, and has

     made over 40 documentary films on wide ranging subjects. All My Babies, one of his first

     films, received numerous awards and was inducted into the National Film Registry in 2002.

    Stoney was also the director of the Challenge for Change project, a socially active

     documentary production wing of the National Film Board of Canada from 1966-70.

     

    With Red Burns, Stoney co-founded the Alternate Media Center in 1972, which trained citizens

     in the tools of video production for a brand new medium, public access television. An early

     advocate of democratic media, Stoney is often cited as being the Father of Public Access

     Television. Today, Stoney sits on the Board of Directors for the Manhattan Neighborhood

     Network and is active in the Alliance for Community Media. Each year, the ACM presents "The

     George Stoney Award" to an organization or individual who has made an outstanding

    contribution to championing the growth and experience of humanistic community

     communications.

     

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    Voice Tribute to his NYU Professor George C. Stoney by Steven Thrasher

    Steven Thrasher

    R.I.P. George Stoney, NYU Film Professor and Godfather of Public Access TV

     
     
     

    NYU film professor, documentarian, and pioneer of cable access George Stoney passed away last week. He was 96 years old.

    I had the opportunity to study under Stoney as a film student at NYU in the late 1990s. Back then, the elderly teacher (always in his trademark hat) cut an iconic silhouette as he wandered the streets of the Village. I saw him taking one of his familiar strolls just a few months ago. As students, my friends and I often marveled at how he kept going at such a strong clip while in his 80s. But according to the Times' obituary, Stoney was still teaching at NYU's Tisch School of the Arts "the last year of his life."

    In addition to the dozens of documentaries Stoney produced and directed, he was a first rate teacher of documentary film. He had an encyclopedic knowledge of American and world documentaries, and his love of the subject was so palpable, it was hard not to fall in love with it, too. I will never forget how he introduced me to the work of Frederic Wiseman at a screening and lecture of Titicut Follies.

    The Times obit gets into a fascinating, huge part of Stoney's life which I knew much less about: how he was kind of the Godfather of cable access.

    With other media-savvy activists -- Stoney helped create the National Federation of Local Cable Programmers, which began lobbying industry and government regulatory agencies. If cable companies were going to put their cables beneath or above public streets, they argued, they should be required to give citizens a share of the new cable broadcast spectrum -- public access. That requirement was added to federal communications law in 1984.

    "There would be no public access if not for George Stoney," said Rika Welsh, another early member of the cable programmers lobbying federation and a board member of Cambridge Community Television, the public-access operator in Boston. "He understood what it could be, and believed in its potential to bring communities together."

     

    Here's a reaction about that, on a blog called Travalanche, from an NYU student who encountered Stoney some years before me:

    He was my academic adviser during my short stint at NYU Tiisch, for no other reason than that he was randomly assigned. At the time I knew only vaguely that he was a documentary maker, and that (at the time) seemed an unfortunate match-up. And Stoney (already quite elderly two decades ago) seemed less than interested in my own dreams and intentions. He just kind of rubber stamped my paperwork during our brief interactions. It wasnt until I began to work at Brooklyn Community Access Television in about 2006 that I learned that he had been a towering and revered figure in the public access community, essentially the guy who started the movement. If I'd only known or cared back then! I've since come to have a deep love and respect for public access, having spent a good bit of time working in the field and even creating some programs. It's kind of the electronic equivalent of indie theatre. But in the early 90s when I was at NYU, I'm sure I considered it (like most people still do) a kind of joke. So now I am left with regret at the lost opportunity to have learned more from the man.

     

    R.I.P. George Stoney, a figure of the Village who will be missed after having taught probably tens of thousands of students.

    You can follow staff writer Steven Thrasher on twitter (@steven_thrasher) or reach him by email (sthrasher@villagevoice.com).

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  • FRIDAY JULY 22, 2016

    Individual programs can be viewed each week

    day 11:00- 11:58 AM  / (NYC Time)

     

                     Channel 34 of the Time/Warner & Channel 82 of the RCN 


                           Cable Television Systems in Manhattan, New York.

     

    The Program can now be viewed on the internet at time of cable casting at

     

                                                  www.mnn.org

                      NOTE: You must adjust viewing to reflect NYC time

     

                        & click on "wATCH nOW" AND THEN CHANNEL 1 at site

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